3 follow-up points from earlier articles

I have been covering an increasingly broad range of topics on this blog, some of which have been recently making the news:

  1. Credits: www.forbes.com
    Credits: www.forbes.com

    A loss-making Twitter has been wooed by a handful of high-tech companies including Google and Salesforce. The Financial Times debates the rationale for such an acquisition: unlike LinkedIn, which was recently acquired by Microsoft, the information published on the social network is fully public – and the ‘voice from the public’ is the only asset that Salesforce could leverage. Google, conversely, can use Twitter as an advertising vehicle – which makes the FT believe that Facebook could also represent a credible bidder. Twitter and Deutsche Bank both suffer from a wrong stance towards diversification (excessive in the case of Deutsche, too limited in the case of Twitter), argues John Gapper from the Financial Times – a view I personally subscribe to.

  2. Large supermarkets have been squeezed between decreasing traffic and food prices and increasing rents. This ‘scissor’ phenomenon has led food retailers to try to diversify their revenue streams; Sainsburry’s has for instance added Argos in-store concessions in some of its largest formats.
  3. Instead of perceiving start-ups as overvalued threats to incumbent tech titans, could we imagine a win-win partnership? This is the question asked by Ludovic Ulrich in TechCrunch. A successful relationship with an established brand name gives credibility to the start-up (and its valuation) and grants immediate access to a much wider audience, while helping the big corporate handle the rapid pace of change. This comes at a time when the IPO window is narrowing, although Takeaway.com managed to list itself last week without any reported quarterly profit yet.

‘Proper’ posts back later this week (hopefully).