More updates…

We start the week with the latest news that have been shaking up some of the topics we have already covered in this blog.

News brought to you courtesy of Warren. Credits: Daily Mail.
News brought to you courtesy of Warren. Credits: Daily Mail.
  • Apple struggles to maintain its market share in China according to the company’s latest filings released last month. Although Apple’s revenues in the country are up 50% compared with 2014, local rivals such as Huawei, Vivo and Oppo have been offering cheaper although similarly powerful devices. The firm is supposedly eyeing towards India as its next revenue growth driver. In the meantime it launched its latest ‘product’, a retrospective book entitled ‘Designed by Apple in California’, and priced the Apple way: $199 to $299 depending on the edition.
  • Twitter has announced it would cut 9% of its workforce in order to keep costs down. This comes at a bad time for the firm which have been increasingly criticised for allowing cyberbullying, racism and misogyny to flourish on its platform and now has to find a new COO after the departure of Adam Bain. Twitter responded by suspending several accounts belonging to right-wing extremist groups, although it has for the moment ruled out ‘instant message moderation’. The idea that “good speech naturally wins out” is a fallacy, argues heather Brooks in the Financial Times.
  • The election of Donald Trump in the US caused a mini-stock market shock to tech values. Mr. Trump is indeed believed to ease the tax policy surrounding corporate earnings made overseas – currently those earnings are taxed at 35% and the rate could go down to as low as 10%. This explains why Microsoft, Apple and Google have been keeping billions of dollars offshore. This news could have been welcomed but are investors actually fearing what executives are going to do with this ‘idle’ money?
  • Notwithstanding this rumour Facebook announced earlier this week a $6bn share buyback aimed at curbing the negative share price impact of an expected growth slowdown expressed during its latest quarterly result presentation. This decision represents an archetype of buyback for ‘wrong’ reasons, as flagged in my post a few months ago. Facebook is not buying shares because it believes they are cheap but because it needs to satisfy its existing shareholders – a typical value-destroying move.
  • Microsoft’s acquisition of LinkedIn could trigger a wave of antitrust challenges, according to Marc Benioff, Salesforce’s CEO. LinkedIn’s data could indeed provide Microsoft with a unique competitive advantage especially in the field of CRM – hence Mr. Benioff’s ire. As a response Microsoft proposed to give rivals access to its software and offer hardware makers the option of installing other services.
  • SoftBank is entering the ‘tech unicorn’ investor market the big way, through the launch of a $100bn fund anchored by Saudi Arabia. The implied equity cheque size (up to $5bn according to its CEO) could provide a private exit door for a handful of existing unicorns reluctant to go through the ‘IPO gateway’.
  • Sigfox, the French ‘Internet of Things’ specialist, could soon join the unicorn club, being valued at €600m according to its latest fundraising round. The operation was relatively unique in the sense that it gathered public entities, private companies and VC funds around the same (investor) table.
  • Fitbit could conversely become the next ‘unicorpse’. The company’s share price has declined by 80% over the last 18 months as tech behemoths have been progressively entering the field of connected objects. On its side, Fitbit tried to put the blame on one of its suppliers to explain its recent supply chain disruptions – whereas analysts attribute this phenomenon to incorrect demand forecast.
  • Karhoo has already reached this status, filing for bankruptcy after just 6 months of activity. The start-up, which raised $250m and was employing 120 people despite only generating $1m of revenues in London. A very aggressive promotional policy, consisting of ‘thousands of pounds of vouchers’, alongside a “ludicrous lack of corporate governance”, led the company to ruin in a highly contested market.
  • Nutmeg managed to raise £30m from international investors despite posting pre-tax losses of £9m this year.
  • Snapshat could be the big IPO of 2017, hoping to raise additional equity at an implied valuation of $20bn to $25bn – although the exact amount still needs to be determined. The two founders will keep the control in any case through the use of preferred shares.
  • Uber faces legal challenges in the UK, where a court ruled that Uber drivers were not independent but actually salaried workers. In France the fact that some Uber drivers could under some circumstances be promised a minimum wage is also a cause for dispute.
  • The Airbnb business model is being challenged in an increasing number of cities. After New York and San Francisco, Berlin and London have joined the fight to prevent the firm from putting pressure on dwelling supply and subsequently pushing rents up in the most touristic areas. After relentlessly fighting all forms of regulatory resistance, the firm has changed its approach and is now intending to strike as many tax deals as possible with the cities it operates in – bringing the figure up from 200 to 700 and covering 90%+ of its revenues.

That is it for this week in terms of updates! Next post (hopefully later this week) will introduce the cybersecurity topic.

Leave a Reply