The future of UK retail in 7 questions (2/2)

[continued from Monday]

Credits: gograph.com
Credits: gograph.com

5. How can retailers use innovation to stop the decline?

To embrace the change rather than trying to fight it in vain, retailers and department stores have started to invest in homegrown start-ups and accelerators. The win-win deal is clear: retailers remain at the forefront of technological innovation applied to their industry while entrepreneurs get instant access to a huge playing field for their products. Unsurprisingly, corporations have become almost as important as VC funds for the funding of accelerators.

Split of accelerator funding by primary source. Source: OpenAxel in the FT.
Split of accelerator funding by primary source. Source: OpenAxel according to the FT.

As previously mentioned, the online and ‘brick-and-mortar’ worlds will be more and more interlinked and the development and use of multi-channel CRM tools will play a great role in ensuring the coherence of the customer journey. Well-designed and innovative apps, allowing fast navigation, speedy checkout and nicely showcasing products will also boost sales – Asos is often mentioned as a ‘best-in-class’ example in that respect.


6. Should retailers own or rent their walls? Or should retailers simply sell their estate and move to an ‘online only’ model?

For years retailers have been told to own their walls. The cost of purchasing and maintaining their estate more than offset the sum of expected future rents which have been increasing at a fast pace – at least more rapidly than inflation. Furthermore, retailers were making a wise investment given soaring real estate prices across the country and especially in ‘prime locations’. Today, one can wonder if the equation still holds. Commercial real estate is expected to take a hit, crystallised by (but not only due to) Brexit, and rent inflation may cool down as a consequence.

This dilemma is worth considering as the ‘online only’ model represents a very difficult customer proposition which has been mastered so far only by a handful of players, including Asos or Made.com. Raising brand awareness and subsequently developing a brand image without any physical shop windows has proved an increasingly daunting challenge in an environment already saturated with incumbent brands. Furthermore, brands with a fading image lose pricing power – Uniqlo is one of the most recent victims of that rule.

Conversely a brand without any ecommerce operations is overseeing a strong growth driver. Some retail experts explain Primark’s recent under-performance by its absence of online shopping website – in this particular case, such a website would prove economically unprofitable for Primark given its low price points.


7. What will be the impact on the commercial property market?

The impact is still hard to assess. One could imagine that the change in culture, lifestyle and demographics, partly embodied by the rise of online, has made the need for physical retailers less obvious and therefore would expect a steady increase in the shop vacancy rate. Actually, the opposite is true: according to the Financial Times, the proportion of vacant shops fell to its lowest level since 2009.

Two possible cumulative drivers can be brought forward. First, service providers, such as restaurants, cafés and hairdressers, have taken the spots left vacant by retailers. Second, historically low interest rates have facilitated the access to debt and therefore boosted the creation of small business ventures – which this kind of service providers typically are.

In practice, though, bargaining power has started to move away from the seller. Two shopping developments have been sold at a significant discount to their original price – the transaction was completed pre-Brexit – and investment into retail property was down 54% in Q1 16 compared with Q1 15. More generally, brands will increasingly focus on prime locations where their products can be showcased at the expense of ‘tier 2’ areas such as suburban shopping centres whose transactional role will be increasingly filled by online shipments. As a consequence, some analysts believe that the UK market can now be covered with 80 to 100 stores as opposed to 200 in the past.

The UK retail industry is definitely facing challenges and shops have been asked with new roles. As announced, this will impact the demand for ‘brick-and-mortar’ sales locations – and ultimately the equilibrium of the commercial real estate market.

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