Brexit – 9 (almost) inexorable consequences

Waving United Kingdom and European Union FlagLast Thursday British people decided to take their country away from the EU. No one knows (yet) how the economic relationship between those two areas will be shaped in the future – for those interested a governmental paper outlines the existing precedents in a very clear and interesting way.

In the meantime, looking at the market reaction, the situation has been seemingly well handled so far and stakeholders believe in a smooth transition rather than an abrupt ending. The CBOE Volatility Index, better known as ‘VIX’ or ‘fear index’, has reached levels which can be considered as modest relative to the ones witnessed in 2008 and is already on a downward trend. As I am writing those words the FTSE 100 is only 3.1% down compared with the 23/06 close and the pound has weakened but not collapsed against other major currencies.

Year-high levels reached by the VIX since 2000. Sources: Yahoo Finance, author analysis.
Year-high levels reached by the VIX since 2000. Sources: Yahoo Finance, author analysis.

In the long-term, however, the usual macroeconomic mechanisms will start acting – some of them are already noticeable. I do not have a crystal ball to tell you when and to which extent those trends will manifest themselves – and the ‘2-year window’ the UK benefits from after triggering article 50 adds to that uncertainty. Other future events could also change the course of action. This list of 9 items has therefore been prepared with the information made publicly available and the convictions I have at the time I write those lines. All in all, though, the picture looks relatively grim and one could fear that the UK is now sitting on a potential economic timebomb.

Credits: http://www.mattgoodwinlaw.com/
Credits: www.mattgoodwinlaw.com
  1. A weakened pound and potentially higher trade barriers will lift inflation. Goods and services from abroad will mechanically become more expensive once their price is translated into pounds – a phenomenon economists call ‘imported inflation’. On top of that, the UK has been enjoying non-existent or low trade barriers, both within and outside the EU,  and it is unlikely that it will be able to negotiate the same terms on its own. Higher trade barriers increase the ‘total cost of purchase’ and therefore inflation.
  2. Lower confidence will weight on growth. The uncertain period we are entering is reinforcing the anxiety-provoking environment in which the developed economies have been living in over the last few months. As a consequence, individuals are likely to save more and consume less and companies are tempted to defer non-essential investments. Thinner money flows ultimately impact GDP.
  3. Interest rates will rise, all other things remaining equal. The UK’s financial strength will decline as it leaves the EU – Standard & Poor’s has already downgraded the country’s credit rating to reflect this point. A weaker credit rating and creditworthiness translates into higher interest rates to reflect a higher probability of default (‘country risk’). I insist on the fact that this is the case all other things remaining equal since we will see later that the Bank of England is likely to have the final word through the benchmark rate.
  4. Rising trade barriers will mitigate the stimulating impact of currency devaluation. Usually, a currency devaluation means that exports are cheaper and therefore more in-demand all other things remaining equal. In our case nonetheless, and as highlighted in point 1, the devaluation comes jointly with an increase in trade barriers that will make exports ‘less more competitive’ than expected. As a result, it is possible that the currency devaluation triggers inflation (as pointed out in 1) without significantly reigniting the economic engine.
  5. There will be a few winners… Companies bearing costs in pounds but selling a large share of their products abroad will benefit from the currency devaluation. The Wall Street Journal mentions Diageo – whose product lines include Scottish whiskey – and pharma behemoths such as AstraZeneca and GSK – whose staff is largely headquartered in the UK while benefiting from a very global sales footprint. Again, this assumes no significant long-term change in the UK’s custom tariffs and policy.
  6. … but there will be many losers: Conversely companies manufacturing goods or providing services with a non-sterling cost base and then selling them in the UK will be negatively affected by the situation. Airlines are a typical example : costs are very often expressed in dollars but tickets are sold in local currencies. Banks got affected since they will not be able to enjoy their ‘passporting‘ right once the UK has exited the EU.
  7. Homeowners may have difficult nights ahead: After several years of continuous (and sometimes impressive) growth, housing prices are likely to flatten or even drop. Several corporations, primarily banks, are thinking about moving part of their operations outside of the UK. This move would impact the demand for housing and thus prices. On top of that, without Central Bank intervention, interest rates are likely to rise, negatively impacting the purchasing power of prospective buyers – and raising the burden on mortgage owners. Homeowners with recent mortgages living in areas where the drop in demand will be the most significant could end up in a ‘negative equity’ situation – a theoretical case where the sale of the house would not be enough to repay the mortgage.
  8. Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England
    Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England

    The situation will create monetary… We have seen that the Brexit could lead the UK into a period of ‘stagflation’, i.e. inflation with limited economic growth. The Bank of England could use monetary policy to either fight against inflation (by increasing benchmark rates) or stimulate growth (by decreasing the same rates). Whereas in the Eurozone the ECB has a clear mandate to focus solely on inflation (I am not saying that this is an optimal solution), the BoE has both growth and inflation management within its remit and will have to make a trade-off. The Telegraph indicates that growth may prevail as the market is not expecting any interest rate rise before 2020.

chart
Source: The Telegraph
George Osborne, (future ex?) Chancellor of the Exchequer
George Osborne, (future ex?) Chancellor of the Exchequer

9. … and fiscal dilemmas. Separately, the government will also have a difficult fiscal decision to make. With tax receipts dropping due to the lower activity, shall it aim for more austerity (and the political consequences attached) or for a fiscal stimulus? In any case, the fiscal and monetary policies will have to be fully aligned to avoid being trapped in the ‘worst of both worlds’ – a situation that some countries are currently facing.

Again, this is based on the assumptions that economic actors keep behaving rationally. Market volatility in the medium-term will indeed be driven less by the outcome of the negotiations than by the way they progress.

The 3 macroeconomic equations underpinning the theory behind this post's thinking.
The 3 macroeconomic equations underpinning the theory behind this post’s thinking. Sorry, couldn’t help myself.

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